“Women Don’t Have to Die from Cervical Cancer”

Two leading women’s health physicians make the case for how we can make cervical cancer a disease of the past.

Side-by-side photo of Dr. Denise Howard on the left and Dr. Eloise Chapman-Davis.

Dr. Denise Howard (left), chief of obstetrics and gynecology at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, and Dr. Eloise Chapman-Davis (right), director of gynecologic oncology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center

According to the American Cancer Society, the United States will have approximately 14,000 new cases of cervical cancer and 4,300 deaths from the disease in 2023. Further, the percentage of people overdue for their cervical cancer screening is growing, and, alarmingly, late-stage cases are on the rise.

In an opinion piece published on CNN.com marking Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Denise Howard, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, and Dr. Eloise Chapman-Davis, director of gynecologic oncology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, make the case that nearly all cervical cancer cases can be eliminated — and give concrete steps for how to make that a reality.

“We have the tools to prevent cervical cancer but fail to use them effectively,” they write, noting advancements in screenings and the HPV vaccine. “It’s time for a full-scale offensive focused on all fronts to make cervical cancer a disease of the past.”

Read their CNN.com opinion piece here.

Eloise Chapman-Davis, M.D., is director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Denise Howard, M.D., M.P.H., is chief of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital and a vice chair in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medicine.